On May 10, 2022, FDA published draft guidance entitled, “Benefit-Risk Considerations for Product Quality Assessments”, which describes the benefit-risk principles applied by FDA when conducting product quality-related assessments of chemistry, manufacturing, and controls (CMC) information submitted for FDA’s review as part of original new drug applications (NDAs), original biologics license applications (BLAs), or supplements to such applications.

In the draft guidance, FDA reiterates its risk-based regulatory approach and applies it in the product quality assessment context.  Specifically, the draft guidance states that FDA continues to identify potential risks to product quality associated with the formulation, manufacturing process, and packaging components when conducting a product quality assessment as well as the proposed control strategy for mitigating those risks.

Continue Reading FDA issues draft guidance for use in product quality assessments

The House Energy and Commerce Committee seems poised to make substantial changes to the Food and Drug Administration’s (“FDA’s”) Accelerated Approval Program. The committee’s Democratic chairman, Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) and Republican ranking member, Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA) have proposed competing bills that were featured prominently in the Health Subcommittee’s legislative hearing on March 17, 2022.

The Accelerated Approval Program was developed in 1982, largely in response to the HIV/AIDs epidemic, to expedite approval of novel drugs that treat serious conditions with unmet medical needs based on a surrogate endpoint.  Drugs that receive accelerated approval must undergo post-approval (Phase IV) studies to confirm the intended clinical benefit.  If the clinical testing does not demonstrate the intended clinical benefit, FDA has mechanisms to remove the drug from the market.

However, concerns have mounted regarding FDA’s ability to remove ineffective drugs from the market, and those concerns were punctuated during a February 3, 2022 Health Subcommittee hearing on the reauthorization of FDA User Fees. Dr. Patrizia Cavazzoni, the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the FDA testified that the program’s existing mechanism to withdraw accelerated approvals is cumbersome, resource intensive, and seldom used.

Continue Reading Competing bills propose amendments to FDA’s accelerated approval program

On October 5, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) published a final rule to establish requirements for the medical device De Novo classification process under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

The final rule, which takes effect January 3, 2022, comes nearly three years after the FDA first proposed it and, notably, sets forth the procedures and criteria for a manufacturer’s voluntary submission and withdrawal of a De Novo request.  Additionally, the rule clarifies how agency staff intends to accept and review the requests, as well as how FDA staff will determine whether to grant or decline the requests.  Finally, the rule also provides a way for combination products to use the De Novo pathway.

Useful for novel, low risk medical devices

The implementation of the De Novo classification process is especially significant for manufacturers of novel, low-risk medical devices.  Prior to the De Novo program, which was created in 1997, any device that lacked a predicate automatically became designated as a Class III device and, therefore, required premarket approval to legally reach the market.  Because this premarket pathway is designed to regulate the riskiest category of devices, manufacturers typically had to endure longer than anticipated wait times for approval of their low-risk devices.

Continue Reading FDA codifies requirements for the medical device De Novo classification process

On July 1, 2021, the Department of Justice (DOJ) released a memorandum signed by Attorney General Merrick Garland regarding the issuance and use of guidance documents. Addressed to the heads of all DOJ components, the memorandum rescinds two previous DOJ memoranda and outlines the principles governing the DOJ’s revised approach in evaluating guidance documents.

2017 Memorandum

On November 16, 2017, then Attorney General Jeff Sessions published a memorandum entitled “Prohibition on Improper Guidance Documents” (the “2017 Memorandum”). The 2017 Memorandum sought to address instances in which guidance documents published by the DOJ were being used to “effectively bind private parties without undergoing the [notice-and-comment] rulemaking process.” Under the 2017 Memorandum, Attorney General Sessions prohibited publication of guidance documents “that purport to create rights or obligations binding on persons or entities outside the Executive Branch (including state, local and tribal governments).”  The 2017 Memorandum directed the DOJ to also adhere to several principles in constructing and publishing guidance documents. These included avoiding the use of mandatory language, specifically noting that voluntary standard non-compliance would not result in enforcement action and including unambiguous statements that published guidance documents were not legally-binding final agency actions.

Brand Memo

Following the 2017 Memorandum, then Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand released a memorandum entitled “Limiting Use of Agency Guidance Documents In Affirmative Civil Enforcement Cases” (the “Brand Memo”). The Brand Memo built upon the publication principles outlined in the 2017 Memorandum and extended them to the DOJ’s legal actions, preventing DOJ lawyers from utilizing non-compliance with guidance documents as a basis for filing a civil lawsuit. While DOJ lawyers could still use guidance documents read by a party as evidence that such party had knowledge of a legal mandate, “that a party fails to comply with agency guidance [documents] expanding upon statutory or regulatory requirements does not mean that the party violated those underlying legal requirements.”

Continue Reading DOJ revises approach to publication and enforcement of guidance documents

On August 2, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”)  published a final rule amending existing regulations (21 C.F.R. § 201.128 and 21 CFR § 801.4) that describe the types of evidence relevant to determine a drug or device’s intended use under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”).  See 86 Fed. Reg. 41,384–85.

This final rule, which takes effect as of September 1, 2021, withdraws and replaces a final rule that FDA promulgated on January 9, 2017, but which never became effective due to an outcry concerning a problematic knowledge provision that was contrary to the statutory scheme of the FDCA and to physicians’ autonomy to use FDA-approved products in an off-label manner.

Prior to the 2021 final rule, FDA issued a proposed rule on September 23, 2020 that eliminated the 2017 rule’s knowledge provision and was much more aligned with FDCA intent and current FDA policy and practice.  FDA maintains, and we agree, that August 2021 final rule remains largely unchanged from the 2020 proposed language.

The following is a review of some important changes that FDA regulated entities should take note of as they develop and market FDA regulated products:

Continue Reading FDA clarifies evidence and knowledge requirements in intended use final rule

The Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) have been fighting fraudulent and deceptive advertising of health care devices, household cleaners, nutrition supplements, and other health care products promising to protect or mitigate the effects of the virus for pandemic-wary consumers since March 2020. Despite these efforts, false and misleading

On August 31, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued draft guidance regarding principles for selecting, developing, modifying, and adapting patient-reported outcome instruments for use in medical device evaluation.[1]  Patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments facilitate the systematic collection of how patients feel and function during a clinical trial.  FDA recognizes this information as important

On June 17, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continued its efforts to mitigate COVID-19’s disrupting impact on clinical trials by issuing guidance on statistical considerations for changes to trial conduct (FDA previously relaxed restrictions on protocol modifications). As expected, public health measures designed to control COVID-19’s rapid emergence as a global pandemic—social distancing, travel

The recently passed “Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act” (CARES Act) is sweeping legislation that will have widespread impact on companies in the health care and life sciences space. In addition to expanding coverage of COVID-19 testing and preventive services, the Act includes provisions to address health care workforce needs, eases restrictions surrounding telehealth

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released new draft guidance documents to clarify its approach to regulating software as a medical device. The first draft guidance, Clinical and Patient Decision Support Software, addresses provision of the 21st Century Cures Act that exempts certain clinical decision support software from the definition of a medical device. 

On June 8, 2017, the Energy and Commerce Committee voted unanimously to approve an amended version of HR 2430, the FDA Reauthorization Act (FDARA) of 2017. The bill would extend the FDA prescription drug, medical device, generic drug, and biosimilar biological product user fee programs, which are scheduled to expire at the end of September. 

President Trump has released his FY 2018 budget proposal, which the Administration dubs “A New Foundation for American Greatness.”  The proposed budget – which received a generally chilly reception on Capitol Hill – offers a mixed bag for the health care industry.  On the one hand, a document summarizing the Department of Health

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have announced that they are making permanent their “Program for Parallel Review of Medical Devices,” which is now operating as a pilot program.  The parallel review initiative allows concurrent FDA and CMS review of a medical device with the goal

As a reminder, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is holding a two-day public meeting on November 9 and 10, 2016 regarding “Manufacturer Communications Regarding Unapproved Uses of Approved or Cleared Medical Products.”  The meeting comes at a time where recent litigation has raised hot-button issues regarding the relationship between FDA, off-label use of

On September 30, 2016, President Obama signed into law S 1878, the Advancing Hope Act, which modifies the FDA’s priority review voucher program for rare pediatric diseases and extends the program through December 31, 2016. In addition, the House has approved a number of health policy bills, including the following:

On November 9 and 10, 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is hosting a public hearing on “Manufacturer Communications Regarding Unapproved Uses of Approved or Cleared Medical Products.” The hearing is intended to inform FDA’s “comprehensive review of its regulations and policies” pertaining to such communications. The FDA poses a number of specific questions to stakeholders, covering such topics as:
Continue Reading FDA to Host Public Hearing on Manufacturer Communications Regarding Unapproved Uses of Medical Products

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee has approved the last of its biomedical innovation bills that form its counterpart to the House 21st Century Cures Act.  Together with the bills cleared by the HELP committee in February and March 2016, the panel has now passed 19 bipartisan medical innovation bills.  The five newly-approved bills are as follows:
Continue Reading Senate HELP Committee Completes Work on Bipartisan “Cures”/Medical Innovation Legislation