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The No Surprises Act, effective as of January 1, 2022, aims to provide patients with accurate information regarding their expected health care spending. In many cases, the new law prevents health care providers from charging patients for costs not reimbursed by insurance. We previously covered the impact of these “balance billing” prohibitions on hospital contracting. However, for the 28 million people in the United States without health insurance coverage or for those seeking care that requires initial self-payment, such as most psychological counseling, these balance billing prohibitions lack relevance because the entire balance is payable by the patient or their representative. The No Surprises Act also includes a potential solution for this group–a mandate that “Good Faith Estimates” (GFEs) be provided to all uninsured or self-pay patients.

Unlike the balance billing restrictions addressed in our prior blog, GFE requirements apply to all health care providers in all settings.  Providers must now generate cost estimates when treating uninsured (including those with insurance who do not want a claim filed) and self-pay patients. Many providers will generate estimates using the same billing systems that existed prior to the No Surprises Act, but some changes may be necessary to meet new regulatory requirements. This post will highlight key provisions relating to GFE, including how to ensure that provider billing practices comply with the new mandate.

Continue Reading No Surprises Act Good Faith Estimates: What they are and when you need them

Effective January 1, 2022, common prohibitions against “balance billing” under hospital professional service contracts will likely become moot due to certain superseding federal prohibitions under the federal No Surprises Act enacted December 27, 2020.  As detailed below, certain hospital-based physicians, including radiologists, anesthesiologists, and pathologists, should keep these new federal billing prohibitions in mind when entering into new hospital professional services agreements (“PSAs”) and revisit their existing agreements to determine whether any changes are appropriate.

“No Surprises Act” Background.

The federal government’s growing focus on surprise medical bills reached a new high on July 1, 2021, when the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS“), along with the Department of Labor and Department of the Treasury, released a consumer-focused interim final rule with comment period taking aim at surprise billing and excessive cost-sharing practices.  The rule, which also cites an ineffective “patchwork” of consumer protections under existing state laws, represents the first implementing regulation under the No Surprises Act.  Both the rule and the statute become effective on or after January 1, 2022.

Balance Billing Prohibition.

This article discusses two distinct but interwoven billing procedures that deserve clarification: “surprise billing” and “balance billing.”

Continue Reading No Surprises Act: Time to revisit balance billing prohibitions in hospital-based physician professional services agreements with hospitals?

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus pandemic (“COVID-19”) introduced several unfamiliar hardships adversely impacting the long-term care industry, especially for nursing homes.  Acknowledging these hardships, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) enacted several temporary emergency blanket waivers effective March 1, 2020, lending flexibility to nursing homes in their COVID-19 response efforts.  Since that time, according

Effective January 14, 2021, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) implemented a final rule (the “Final Rule”) concerning the tax deductibility of settlement payments made to the government.  This rulemaking followed a legislative update to the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (“IRC”), which was implemented as part of the 2017 federal tax overhaul and specifically included

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released complementary rules this past Friday, November 20, 2020, to modernize and clarify the regulations that interpret the Physician Self-Referral Law (the Stark Law) and the federal Anti-Kickback Statute.

As we wrote when the proposed rules were released last autumn (see client alerts here and here),

On August 27, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) filed an interim final rule with comment period (“IFC”), detailing new long-term care (“LTC”) facility COVID-19 testing requirements and strengthening enforcement of existing related facility reporting requirements.  According to CMS, the IFC represents the agency’s latest effort in an ongoing initiative to control

On June 1, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) unveiled new measures designed to enhance enforcement and oversight of nursing homes and related state survey agencies.  CMS announced the new policies concurrently with the release of federal data detailing the incidence of nursing home COVID-19 infections, which was also made available on

As discussed in our client alert, recent legal developments have greatly expanded funding for and access to telehealth services during the COVID-19 crisis.

Among the changes instituted by HHS are expanded Medicare coverage and payment for services, reduced or waived cost-sharing obligations for physicians, and loosening of the HIPAA enforcement policies for covered entities

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services filed a Notice of Enforcement Decision on Friday, April 26, 2019, announcing a new system of annual penalty limits for HIPAA violations based on an entity’s level of culpability. The agency revised its previous interpretation of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH

In a transmittal issued last week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) extended newly-revised supervision rules for certain diagnostic tests paid via the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) to services paid under the Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) for hospital outpatient departments. The transmittal relates to services performed by a registered radiologist assistant