Food & Drug Administration Regulations

On October 31, FDA will be offering a webinar on its proposed rule ”Medical Devices; Laboratory Developed Tests.”

This webinar comes about a month after FDA issued a proposed rule revising 21 C.F.R. Part 809 (specifically, 21 C.F.R, § 809.3) to state, explicitly, that in vitro diagnostics (IVDs) are medical devices, even if they are developed and manufactured in a laboratory setting.

This category of tests is generally referred to as “laboratory developed tests” (LDTs) and FDA has historically extended enforcement discretion, accepting the availability of certain LDTs outside of the FDA device clearance and approval pathway.

Of course this has not been a straightforward situation: we have seen decades of debate among FDA and industry stakeholders about the exact boundaries of FDA’s expressed enforcement discretion—where those boundaries should lie, and even interpretation (gleaned from enforcement action) of more precisely where they do, in FDA practice, actually lie.Continue Reading The Latest Episode of the LDT Drama: FDA Issues Long-Awaited Proposed Rule for Laboratory Developed Tests

Note: This is Part 2 in a series of blog posts on developments from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) regarding its commitments set forth under the Prescription Drug Under Fee Act Reauthorization Performance Goals and Clinical Trial Diversity and Modernization mandates established by Congress under the Food and Drug Omnibus Reform Act of 2022 (FDORA), including developments on the intersection and use of digital health technology in clinical trials and clinical trial diversity. Part 1, covering the Digital Health Technologies framework is available here.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released draft guidance intended to help modernize the design and conduct of clinical trials by making them more efficient and enabling them to incorporate the newest technological and methodological advancements into their design.

FDA continues to issue guidance in the wake of the Food and Drug Omnibus Reform Act of 2022 (FDORA), which in part requires FDA to provide further oversight and guidance on “Clinical Trial Diversity and Modernization.” Under Section 3607(c) of FDORA, consistent with its obligations modernize clinical trials, FDA is specifically required to “work with foreign regulators pursuant to memoranda of understanding or other arrangements governing the exchange of information to facilitate international harmonization of the regulation” as it pertains to innovative approaches to clinical trial design and implementation.Continue Reading FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Good Clinical Practice in Ongoing Clinical Trial Modernization Efforts

Note: This is Part 1 in a series of blog posts on developments from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) regarding its commitments set forth under the Prescription Drug Under Fee Act Reauthorization Performance Goals and Clinical Trial Diversity and Modernization mandates established by Congress under the Food and Drug Omnibus Reform Act of 2022 (FDORA), including developments on the intersection and use of digital health technology in clinical trials and clinical trial diversity.

The Food and Drug Omnibus Reform Act of 2022 (FDORA) signed by President Biden on December 29, 2022, introduced significant changes to the way in which FDA will provide oversight for clinical trials as it pertains to “Clinical Trial Diversity and Modernization.” Under FDORA, among other things, FDA is required to issue guidance on decentralized clinical trials (which is a clinical trial in which some or all trial-related activities occur at a location separate from the investigator’s location) and to provide clarification on the use of digital health technologies (DHTs) in clinical trials.

Prior to the passage of FDORA, FDA set its sights on DHTs in the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) VII Commitment Letter, acknowledging the increased use of DHTs in drug development and the need for appropriate internal expertise and external guidance for their use and evaluation.Continue Reading New Opportunities, New Challenges: FDA Elaborates on use of Digital Health in Drug and Biological Product Development

On October 5, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) published a final rule to establish requirements for the medical device De Novo classification process under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

The final rule, which takes effect January 3, 2022, comes nearly three years after the FDA first proposed it and, notably, sets forth the procedures and criteria for a manufacturer’s voluntary submission and withdrawal of a De Novo request.  Additionally, the rule clarifies how agency staff intends to accept and review the requests, as well as how FDA staff will determine whether to grant or decline the requests.  Finally, the rule also provides a way for combination products to use the De Novo pathway.

Useful for novel, low risk medical devices

The implementation of the De Novo classification process is especially significant for manufacturers of novel, low-risk medical devices.  Prior to the De Novo program, which was created in 1997, any device that lacked a predicate automatically became designated as a Class III device and, therefore, required premarket approval to legally reach the market.  Because this premarket pathway is designed to regulate the riskiest category of devices, manufacturers typically had to endure longer than anticipated wait times for approval of their low-risk devices.Continue Reading FDA codifies requirements for the medical device De Novo classification process

On August 2, 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”)  published a final rule amending existing regulations (21 C.F.R. § 201.128 and 21 CFR § 801.4) that describe the types of evidence relevant to determine a drug or device’s intended use under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”).  See 86 Fed. Reg. 41,384–85.

This final rule, which takes effect as of September 1, 2021, withdraws and replaces a final rule that FDA promulgated on January 9, 2017, but which never became effective due to an outcry concerning a problematic knowledge provision that was contrary to the statutory scheme of the FDCA and to physicians’ autonomy to use FDA-approved products in an off-label manner.

Prior to the 2021 final rule, FDA issued a proposed rule on September 23, 2020 that eliminated the 2017 rule’s knowledge provision and was much more aligned with FDCA intent and current FDA policy and practice.  FDA maintains, and we agree, that August 2021 final rule remains largely unchanged from the 2020 proposed language.

The following is a review of some important changes that FDA regulated entities should take note of as they develop and market FDA regulated products:Continue Reading FDA clarifies evidence and knowledge requirements in intended use final rule

The Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) have been fighting fraudulent and deceptive advertising of health care devices, household cleaners, nutrition supplements, and other health care products promising to protect or mitigate the effects of the virus for pandemic-wary consumers since March 2020. Despite these efforts, false and misleading

On October 28, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued an interim final rule with comment period (IFR) in an effort to ensure that participants in CMS programs have no-cost access to any forthcoming Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccine.

The IFR governs any vaccine that

On August 31, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued draft guidance regarding principles for selecting, developing, modifying, and adapting patient-reported outcome instruments for use in medical device evaluation.[1]  Patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments facilitate the systematic collection of how patients feel and function during a clinical trial.  FDA recognizes this information as important

On June 17, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continued its efforts to mitigate COVID-19’s disrupting impact on clinical trials by issuing guidance on statistical considerations for changes to trial conduct (FDA previously relaxed restrictions on protocol modifications). As expected, public health measures designed to control COVID-19’s rapid emergence as a global pandemic—social distancing, travel

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have announced that they are making permanent their “Program for Parallel Review of Medical Devices,” which is now operating as a pilot program.  The parallel review initiative allows concurrent FDA and CMS review of a medical device with the goal

The federal Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) recently published a draft guidance on labeling for biosimilar products that is intended to assist applicants in developing draft labeling for proposed biosimilar products.

What is a biosimilar product?

Biosimilar products are biological products that are highly similar to an FDA-approved biological product, known as a reference product. Notwithstanding minor differences in clinically inactive components, there can be no clinically meaningful differences between the biological product and the reference product in terms of the safety and efficacy.  In 2010, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”) was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act in order to provide an abbreviated licensure pathway for a biosimilar that partly relies on the data originally submitted to the FDA by the reference product sponsor for approval.
Continue Reading FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Labeling For Biosimilar Products

On August 28, 2015 the federal Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) issued two important policies regarding naming biological products, including biosimilars. First, FDA released a notice announcing the availability of draft guidance entitled “Nonproprietary Naming of Biological Products.” The draft guidance highlights FDA’s current thinking on the need for biological products licensed under the Public

Earlier this week, the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a notice in the Federal Register (80 Fed. Reg. 46033) announcing the fee rates and payment procedures for medical device user fees for fiscal year (FY) 2016, which apply from October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), as amended by the Medical Device User Fee Amendments of 2012 (MDUFA III), authorizes FDA to collect user fees for certain medical device submissions and annual fees both for certain periodic reports and for establishments subject to registration. For FY 2016, the standard premarket application (PMA) fee will be $261,388; by comparison, the PMA fee in FY 2015 is $250,895.
Continue Reading FDA Announces Medical Device User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2016

On July 8, 2015, the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule requiring drug manufacturers to report to the Agency any supply chain disruptions that could lead to drug shortages. The final rule implements provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Action of 2012 (FDASIA) (Pub. L. No. 112-144). FDA believes that this final rule will improve its ability to identify potential drug shortages and to prevent or mitigate the impact of these shortages.
Continue Reading FDA Final Rule Mandates Drug Manufacturer Notification of Impending Drug Shortages

The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a notice requesting that public stakeholders –including patient and consumer advocacy groups, health care professionals, and scientific and academic experts– notify FDA of their intent to participate in monthly consultation meetings on the reauthorization of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA). When the statutory

The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just announced that the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) deadline of July 1, 2015 for dispenser requirements related to capturing and maintaining pedigree information will not be enforced until November 1, 2015. This means dispensers have an additional four months to establish a commercially-viable and operational system that can exchange, capture, and maintain product tracing information for certain prescription drugs. Specifically, on July 6, 2015, the FDA issued a notice announcing the availability of guidance for industry entitled “DSCSA Implementation: Product Tracing Requirements for Dispensers – Compliance Policy” (DSCSA Compliance Policy). The guidance arises from the 2013 DSCSA, which added sections 581 and 582 to the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) and set forth new definitions and requirements for the tracing of products through the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain. The DSCSA requires trading partners (i.e., manufacturers, wholesale distributors, dispensers, and repackagers) to exchange product tracing information when engaging in transactions involving certain prescription drugs. For dispensers, DSCSA requirements for the tracing of products through the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain went into effect on July 1, 2015.
Continue Reading FDA Helps Dispensers Enjoy the Summer with Generous DSCSA Compliance Policy

As discussed on our Life Sciences Legal Update blog, the FDA has released draft guidance clarifying its acceptance of medical device clinical data from studies conducted outside of the United States. The draft guidance highlights special considerations that apply when using foreign clinical data, including applicability to populations within the US, and provides recommendations

As discussed on our sister blog, Life Sciences Legal Update, the FDA has published a notice soliciting comments on a draft guidance document on the use of electronic media and processes to obtain informed consent for FDA-regulated clinical investigations of medical products.  The HHS Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) also is considering

The FDA published a proposed rule on December 18, 2014 that would require electronic distribution of the prescribing information intended for health care professionals, which is currently distributed in paper form on or within the prescription drug or biological product packaging. FDA also is proposing that prescribing information intended for health care professionals will no

Last February, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asked for public feedback on a proposed research study related to prescription drug television advertisements. In a notice published in the Federal Register on January 13, 2015, FDA announced its intention to continue to move forward with the proposed study. Specifically, the notice announced that