Department of Health and Human Services

On August 26, 2022, the Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and Treasury (the “Departments”) issued the highly anticipated Requirements Related to Surprise Billing (“August 2022 Final Rule”) and associated guidance materials concerning the independent dispute resolution (“IDR”) process established by the No Surprises Act. The August 2022 Final Rule is narrow in scope and responds to two recent decisions by the Eastern District of Texas vacating portions of the October 2021 Interim Final Rule, Requirements Related to Surprise Billing: Part II (“IFR II), and incorporates stakeholder comments solicited by the Departments.

Importantly, as discussed more below, the August 2022 Final Rule removes the qualifying payment amount (“QPA”) as the presumptive factor in IDR payment decisions and requires health plans to submit additional information in the IDR process for cases where a claim at issue was “downcoded” by the plan.   

The August 2022 Final Rule will take effect October 25, 2022, 60 days after its publication in the Federal Register

Continue Reading Departments issue new Final Rule and guidance materials for No Surprises Act IDR process

On June 29, 2022, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) issued two pieces of guidance clarifying the applicability of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) related to privacy of information connected to an individual’s reproductive health. 

Through this guidance, HIPAA addresses both protected health information (“PHI”), which is subject to HIPAA’s rules, as well as general, personal information that is not directly protected by HIPAA.

Continue Reading New Guidance by OCR addresses HIPAA and Disclosures of Information relating to Reproductive Health

On February 4, 2022, the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) issued a favorable advisory opinion on a proposal by a nonprofit children’s hospital to enter into an arrangement with two individual donors, who intend on making a testamentary gift to the hospital that would be used to reduce and subsidize costs incurred by patients.

The OIG indicated it would not impose administrative sanctions, despite the fact that the proposed arrangement would not fall squarely within any safe harbor under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (“AKS”) or exception to the definition of “remuneration” for purposes of the beneficiary inducement prohibition (“Beneficiary Inducement CMP”).

Arrangement created restricted endowment fund

Under the proposed arrangement, the hospital would be the beneficiary to a restricted endowment fund established through a testamentary gift from two donors. The fund would be used to subsidize bills for families with children who have an established care relationship with the hospital’s physicians and who receive services provided by the hospital’s programs.

Continue Reading OIG approves arrangement involving a testamentary gift to a nonprofit hospital to reduce costs for pediatric patients

The No Surprises Act, effective as of January 1, 2022, aims to provide patients with accurate information regarding their expected health care spending. In many cases, the new law prevents health care providers from charging patients for costs not reimbursed by insurance. We previously covered the impact of these “balance billing” prohibitions on hospital contracting. However, for the 28 million people in the United States without health insurance coverage or for those seeking care that requires initial self-payment, such as most psychological counseling, these balance billing prohibitions lack relevance because the entire balance is payable by the patient or their representative. The No Surprises Act also includes a potential solution for this group–a mandate that “Good Faith Estimates” (GFEs) be provided to all uninsured or self-pay patients.

Unlike the balance billing restrictions addressed in our prior blog, GFE requirements apply to all health care providers in all settings.  Providers must now generate cost estimates when treating uninsured (including those with insurance who do not want a claim filed) and self-pay patients. Many providers will generate estimates using the same billing systems that existed prior to the No Surprises Act, but some changes may be necessary to meet new regulatory requirements. This post will highlight key provisions relating to GFE, including how to ensure that provider billing practices comply with the new mandate.

Continue Reading No Surprises Act Good Faith Estimates: What they are and when you need them

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, firearm injuries are a serious public health problem in the United States. To combat this problem, many states have passed extreme risk protection order (“ERPO”) laws, otherwise known as “red flag laws.”

ERPO laws allow various individuals, including family members, health care providers, and law enforcement

In an increasingly digital and interconnected world, the privacy and security of personal information is a significant concern. Applications and connected devices collect a bevy of personal information from consumers, including sensitive information about consumers’ health. Because of the sensitivity of health information, the United States has developed a variety of legal protections and enforcement

In a report released on September 2, 2021 the Biden administration announced its plan to help prepare the nation for future pandemic threats. In the report, named American Pandemic Preparedness: Transforming Our Capabilities, the administration described what it sees as the vital need to change the nation’s capabilities to better respond to any future pandemics or biological threats.

The report organizes the proposed actions under five pillars: (1) Transforming Medical Defenses, (2) Ensuring Situational Awareness, (3) Strengthening Public Health Systems, (4) Building Core Capabilities, and (5) Managing the Mission

The report calls for action to “not just refill our stockpiles, but also to transform our capabilities.” The report compares the proposed plan to the Apollo space program because of the importance that the administration is placing on the efforts as well as the proposed coordination among agencies and departments.

Ultimately, the administration is planning to create a centralized “mission control” that would work to coordinate resources and expertise from multiple agencies within the Department of Health and Human Services like the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (a component of the office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response), Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicare Services, along with other cabinet-level departments such as the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, and the Veterans Administration.

Continue Reading Biden administration looks to centralize pandemic response in preparedness plan

The flurry of Covid-19 vaccine administration that marked the mid spring to early summer resulting in millions of doses administered daily has given way to a steady stream of approximately 700,000 doses of vaccine administered daily, according to some analysis of CDC data.

But now that August has arrived so has the need for regularly scheduled pediatric vaccines to be administered as schools open up again. Also, next month marks the beginning of flu season and its flood of vaccine requests. All of this demand for vaccine administration could threaten to overwhelm some of the pharmacies that have typically been a destination for quick and easy vaccine administration.

On August 4, the HHS officially amended the PREP Act declaration on medical countermeasures against Covid-19 in an effort to stave off any bottle-necking at pharmacies that administer flu vaccines. The declaration amendment, which took immediate effect and last until the end of the public health emergency officially included qualified pharmacy technicians and interns  as “qualified persons” permitted to administer seasonal influenza vaccines to adults age 19 and older. Additionally, the amendment officially identifies the same techs and interns as authorized to administer the Covid-19 vaccine as well as pediatric vaccines that are on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) schedule.

Continue Reading HHS authorizes pharmacy technicians and interns to administer flu vaccines

Starting in 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has taken an increased interest in protecting patients’ right of access to protected health information (“PHI”) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”). Over the past twenty months, OCR has announced nineteen settlements under its Right of Access

On July 1, 2021, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (“HRSA”) notified recipients of Provider Relief Fund (“PRF”) payments via e-mail that the PRF Reporting Portal is now open for providers who are required to report on the use of funds in Reporting Period 1

On June 9, 2021, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) shared a cyber-alert containing important updates on how companies can protect their operations from ransomware attacks. The guidance comes from the White House and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. The memo, entitled “What We Urge You To Do To Protect Against The Threat of

On June 11, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced that it had released revised reporting requirements for those providers and suppliers that have received Provider Relief Fund payments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Readers may recall that HHS previously issued notices on post-payment reporting requirements starting in July 2020, and that previous

On May 18, 2021, in a statement issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of Inspector General, Acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of California, Phillip Talbert, and California Attorney General, Rob Bonta (the Statement), the health care industry was reminded of the prohibition against charging individuals for COVID-19

On May 14, 2021, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new final rule that further delays until December 15, 2021, the effective date of the final rule titled “Medicare Program; Medicare Coverage of Innovative Technology (MCIT) and Definition of ‘Reasonable and Necessary’” (the January 2021 Rule), which was published in the

On May 10, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced that— consistent with the Supreme Court’s decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, 140 S. Ct. 1731 (2020), and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972—HHS’s Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”) will interpret and enforce the prohibition on discrimination on the

On May 3, 2021, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published an 81-page final rule to both extend and change the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model. We previously reported on the proposed rule here. The CJR model was initially implemented by way of notice-and-comment rulemaking in April 2016; the recent

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus pandemic (“COVID-19”) introduced several unfamiliar hardships adversely impacting the long-term care industry, especially for nursing homes.  Acknowledging these hardships, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) enacted several temporary emergency blanket waivers effective March 1, 2020, lending flexibility to nursing homes in their COVID-19 response efforts.  Since that time, according

It is no secret that the coronavirus pandemic has driven our daily lives digital—work, education, social gatherings, and, of course, health care. Congress and CMS responded to the public health emergency by waiving limitations on reimbursement for telehealth services rendered to Medicare patients. These waivers introduced new flexibility and vastly expanded Medicare patients’ access to

On January 28, 2021, the White House issued President Biden’s Executive Order on Strengthening Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act (the “Executive Order”), which seeks to increase access to affordable health insurance and strengthen Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act, particularly in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  In addition to this Executive Order, the

On the last full day of the Trump Administration, the Department of Justice (DOJ) submitted a statement of interest in litigation supporting the position that the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act preempts legal claims relating to the administration or use of covered countermeasures with respect to a public health emergency and, therefore, makes