CMS Releases Physician-Specific Medicare Charge/Payment Data

CMS has released its highly-anticipated data files with Medicare payment data for individual Medicare physicians and certain other Part B suppliers as part of the Obama Administration’s initiative “to make our healthcare system more transparent, affordable, and accountable.” Specifically, the “Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File” contains information on utilization, payment (allowed amount and Medicare payment), and submitted charges organized by National Provider Identifier (NPI)/provider last name, Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code, and place of service for physician/supplier Part B non-institutional line items for the Medicare fee-for-service population for calendar year 2012. The files include data on services furnished by physicians, non-physician practitioners, laboratories, imaging, and ambulances, but not durable medical equipment (DME). To protect Medicare beneficiary privacy, any aggregated records derived from 10 or fewer beneficiaries are excluded from the dataset.

CMS cautions that the dataset has a number of limitations, including that the data may not be representative of a physician’s entire practice since it only includes information regarding Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries. Moreover, CMS notes that the data are not intended to indicate the quality of care provided and are not risk-adjusted to reflect differences in the severity of disease of patient populations.  In an accompanying blog post, Jonathan Blum, Principal Deputy Administrator of CMS, notes that the agency hopes that “businesses and consumers alike can use these data to drive decision-making and reward quality, cost-effective care.”

Obama Administration Proposes FY 2015 Budget with Medicare, Medicaid Savings Provisions

On March 4, 2014, the Obama Administration released its proposed federal budget for fiscal year (FY) 2015. Virtually all types of health care providers, health plans, and drug manufacturers would be impacted by the budget provisions if adopted as proposed – an unlikely scenario given the Republican House leadership’s reaction to the document. Nevertheless, the Medicare and Medicaid savings proposals (many of which are carry-overs from prior budgets) could resurface as spending offsets in the pending negotiations on Medicare physician fee schedule reform legislation or in future budget negotiations. Highlights of the Administration’s Medicare and Medicaid legislative proposals include the following (all savings estimates are for the 10-year period of FYs 2015-2024):

Major Medicare Provider Payment Provisions

The proposed FY 2015 budget includes a package of Medicare legislative proposals estimated to save $407.2 billion over 10 years.

  • Reduce Medicare coverage of bad debts from 65% in most cases to 25% over three years starting in 2015 ($30.8 billion/10 years).
  • Reduce Medicare indirect medical education add-on payments by $14.6 billion (although a new targeted grant program would reinvest $5.2 billion of these savings).
  • Reduce critical access hospital (CAH) reimbursement to 100% of costs ($1.7 billion) and limit CAH designation eligibility for hospitals within 10 miles of another hospital ($720 million).
  • Reduce payment updates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), long-term care hospitals (LTCHs), skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and home health agencies (HHAs) by 1.1 percentage points each year from 2015 through 2024 (the update could not fall below 0%). The SNF reduction would be accelerated, beginning with a -2.5% update in FY 2015, tapering down to a -0.97% update in FY 2022. These provisions would save $97.9 billion over 10 years.
  • Implement bundled payment for post-acute care providers, including LTCHs, IRFs, SNFs, and HHAs beginning in 2019, with rates set to produce a permanent and total cumulative adjustment of 2.85% by 2021, and beneficiary coinsurance equal to current levels ($8.7 billion).
  • Adjust the standard for classifying a facility as an IRF (at least 75% of patient cases admitted to an IRF must meet one or more of 13 designated conditions), saving $2.4 billion.
  • Reduce by up to 3% payments to SNFs with high rates of care-sensitive, preventable hospital readmissions, beginning in 2018 ($1.9 billion).
  • Equalize IRF and SNF payments for certain conditions involving hips and knees, pulmonary conditions, and other conditions selected by the Secretary ($1.6 billion).
  • Implement a budget neutral value-based purchasing program for additional provider types, including SNFs, HHAs, ambulatory surgical centers, and hospital outpatient departments beginning in 2016. At least 2% of payments must be tied to the quality and efficiency of care.
  • Align Medicare payment for clinical laboratory services with private sector rates and encourage electronic reporting of laboratory results ($7.9 billion).
  • Strengthen the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) by reducing the target rate of Medicare cost growth from gross domestic product plus one percentage point to plus 0.5 percentage point, which would make it easier to trigger ACA provisions requiring reductions to Medicare provider reimbursement ($12.9 billion).
  • The budget endorses reform of the sustainable growth rate formula used to update Medicare physician fee schedule payments, including a period of predictable payments followed by reimbursement tied to alternative payment models and value-based purchasing, along the lines of pending Congressional reform legislation.

Prescription Drug Provisions

  • Reduce payment for physician-administered Medicare Part B drugs from 106% to 103% of average sales price (ASP). If a physician’s cost for purchasing the drug exceeds 103% of ASP, the drug manufacturer would be required to provide a rebate to ensure that the provider’s net cost to acquire the drug equals 103% of ASP minus an overhead fee to be determined by the Secretary. The Secretary would be authorized to pay a portion of the entire amount above ASP as a flat fee rather than a percentage in a budget-neutral manner. This proposal is estimated to result in $6.8 billion in savings.
  • Provide Medicaid-level drug rebates for brand name and generic drugs provided to Medicare beneficiaries who receive Part D low-income subsidies, beginning in 2016 ($117.3 billion).
  • Effectively close the Medicare Part D coverage gap by 2016, rather than 2020, by increasing manufacturer “coverage gap” discounts from 50% to 75% beginning in plan year 2016 ($7.9 billion).
  • Allow the Secretary to suspend coverage and payment for Part D drugs (1) prescribed by providers who have misprescribed or overprescribed drugs with abuse potential, and (2) that pose an imminent risk to patients. The Secretary also could require additional information on certain Part D prescriptions, such as diagnosis and incident codes, as a condition of coverage.
  • Encourage the use of generic drugs by Part D low-income subsidy beneficiaries by modifying copayments ($8.5 billion).
  • Lower Medicaid drug costs by clarifying the definition of brand drugs, collecting an additional rebate for generic drugs when prices grow faster than inflation, and including certain prenatal vitamins and fluorides in the rebate program. The plan also would make a technical correction to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) alternative rebate for new drug formulations, limit to 12 quarters the timeframe for which manufacturers can dispute drug rebate amounts, exclude authorized generic drugs from average manufacturer price calculations for determining rebate obligations for brand drugs, and calculate Medicaid federal upper limits based only on generic drug prices. These proposals are projected to save $8.6 billion over 10 years.
  • Direct states to track high prescribers and utilizers of Medicaid prescription drugs ($540 million).
  • Require manufacturers to pay Medicaid rebate equal to the entire amount that the state has paid for the drugs in cases where the state improperly reported non-drug products as covered outpatient drugs, or where the state improperly reported drugs that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found to be less than effective. In addition, the budget would allow more regular audits and surveys of manufacturers to ensure compliance with Medicaid drug rebate agreement requirements; require drugs to be electronically listed with the FDA to receive Medicaid coverage; and increase penalties for reporting false information for the calculation of Medicaid rebates.
  • Increase the availability of generic drugs and biologics by authorizing the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to stop companies from entering into “pay for delay” agreements ($9.1 billion) and modifying the length of exclusivity on brand name biologics ($4 billion).

Major Program Integrity/Efficiency Provisions

  • Expand funding for the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) program, the Medicaid Integrity Program, and Medicaid Fraud Control Units, and other Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) program integrity efforts.
  • Expand the current authority to exclude individuals and entities from federal health programs if they are affiliated with a sanctioned entity by closing a “loophole” that allows an officer, managing employee, or owner of a sanctioned entity to avoid exclusion by resigning his or her position or divesting his or her ownership; and extending the exclusion authority to entities affiliated with a sanctioned entity ($60 million in savings).
  • Authorize civil monetary penalties or other intermediate sanctions for providers who do not update enrollment records ($90 million).
  • Expand authority to investigate and prosecute allegations of abuse or neglect of Medicaid beneficiaries in non-institutional settings.
  • Exclude radiation therapy, therapy services, advanced imaging, and anatomic pathology services from the in-office ancillary services exception to the prohibition against physician self-referrals (Stark law), except in cases where a practice meets certain accountability standards, as defined by the Secretary effective for calendar year 2016 ($6 billion).
  • Expand the authority of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to require prior authorization for all Medicare fee-for-service items, and mandate prior authorization of advance imaging services and power mobility devices ($90 million).
  • Allow the Secretary to create a system to validate practitioners’ orders for certain high-risk items and services.
  • Increase reporting and review of so-called “higher-risk” banking arrangements to receive Medicare payments (such as “sweep accounts” that immediately transfer funds from a financial account to an investment account in another jurisdiction, preventing Medicare from recovering improper payments).

Other Medicare & Medicaid Provisions

  • Increase the minimum Medicare Advantage (MA) coding intensity adjustment ($31 billion).
  • Modify documentation requirement for face-to-face encounters for durable medical equipment (DME), orthotics, prosthetics, and supplies (DMEPOS) to allow certain non-physician practitioners to document the face-to-face encounter.
  • Revise beneficiary cost-sharing requirements, including increased income-related premiums under Parts B and D, a new home health copayment, increased Part B deductible for new enrollees, and increased premiums for beneficiaries with Medigap policies with particularly low cost-sharing requirements.
  • Base Medicaid rates for DME on Medicare rates ($3.1 billion).
  • Rebase future Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) allotments to account for levels of uncompensated care under ACA coverage expansion ($3.3 billion).

Bipartisan/Bicameral SGR Reform Bill Released; Offsets Not Yet Identified

The bipartisan leadership of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, House Ways & Means Committee, and Senate Finance Committee have released a consensus Medicare physician fee schedule reform bill expected to be considered by Congress before the latest temporary payment patch expires at the end of March. Highlights of H.R. 4015, the SGR Repeal and Medicare Provider Payment Modernization Act, include the following:

  • The bill would repeal the statutory “Sustainable Growth Rate” (SGR) provision, which has called for deep cuts in Medicare rates in recent years. Congress has routinely stepped in to override the full application of the formula – most recently replacing a 20.1% cut scheduled to go into effect January 1, 2014 with a 0.5% update for the first three months of 2014 – but H.R. 4015 would offer a permanent fix.
  • For five years (2014-2018) the bill would provide annual Medicare physician fee schedule updates of 0.5% during a transition period to a new quality-based system (thus for 2014, the temporary 0.5% update in place through March would be extended for the full year). 
  • Three current physician quality programs would be consolidated into a single value-based program called the “Merit-Based Incentive Payment System,” which starting in 2018 would tie payment to performance in four categories: quality; resource use; electronic health record meaningful use; and clinical practice improvement activities. Quality measures will be developed and updated in consultation with physicians and other stakeholders.
  • The bill would provide bonus payments to providers who receive a significant portion of their revenue from an alternative payment model (APM) or patient centered medical home (PCMH); the threshold would begin at 25% in 2018 and increase over time. 
  •  The measure includes a number of other provisions designed to improve payment accuracy for individual provider services, promote appropriate use criteria for certain advanced diagnostic imaging services, expand care coordination for individuals with chronic care, and expand the use of Medicare data for transparency and quality improvement.

A formal budget estimate for the package has not yet been released, although earlier versions of the plans have had 10-year costs of more than $121 billion over 10 years. The Committees have not yet identified what “offsets” would be used to pay for the package, but cuts impacting a broad range of health care provider types, health plans, and drug manufacturers have all been unofficially floated as options.  

CMS Loosens Restrictions on Disclosure of Physician-Specific Medicare Payment Data

As part of its ongoing efforts to make Medicare data more transparent and accessible, CMS has ended its blanket restriction on disclosure of information about Medicare payments to individual physicians when requested under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).   Instead, CMS will now consider on a case-by-case basis whether exemption 6 of FOIA, which requires CMS to balance the privacy interest of individual physicians against the public interest in disclosure of such information, applies to a given request for information pertaining to Medicare payments to individual physicians.  CMS notes that since “the outcome of the balancing test will depend on the circumstances, the outcomes of these analyses may vary depending on the facts of each case.”  In a blog post, CMS contends that potential benefits associated with release of such information could include:

  • Allowing providers to collaborate on improved health care management and delivery at lower costs;
  • Giving consumers broader, more reliable measures of provider quality and performance to drive innovation and competition while informing consumer choice; and
  • Enabling journalists and others to identify waste, fraud, abuse, and unsafe practices.

In addition to reiterating its commitment to protecting the privacy of Medicare beneficiaries, CMS states that it intends “to consider the importance of protecting physicians’ privacy and ensuring the accuracy of any data released as well as appropriate protections to limit potential misuse of the information.” The official version of the notice will be published on January 17. 

President Signs 2-Year Funding Bill with Medicare SGR Patch, Sequestration Extension for Medicare Providers

This post was written by Debbie McCurdy and Paul Pitts.

On December 26, 2013, President Obama signed into law H.J. Res. 59, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013, which includes the Pathway for SGR Reform Act of 2013 (“the Act”). In addition to establishing federal budget targets for fiscal years (FYs) 2014 and 2015, the Act includes a number of provisions impacting the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Most notably, the Act provides a short-term reprieve from a looming Medicare physician fee schedule cut while lawmakers work to finalize a longer-term solution. It also extends Medicare provider payment cuts under existing sequestration authority for two years and makes a variety of other policy changes. The Act’s major Medicare and Medicaid provisions are summarized below.

Short-Term Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Patch. The final Medicare physician fee schedule rule, which was published on December 10, 2013, called for a 20.1% reduction in the fee schedule update for 2014, largely as a result of the statutory sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula.  The Act blocks the 20.1% cut and replaces it with a 0.5% increase for services provided through March 31, 2014, resulting in a 2014 conversion factor after all adjustments of $35.8228 (note that Medicare sequestration cuts applicable to the MPFS and other Medicare payment systems continue, as described below.). This temporary payment boost is intended to provide Congress with additional time to finalize pending legislation that would permanently repeal the SGR policy and replace it with a period of stable payment followed by reimbursement linked to quality of care. Bipartisan SGR reform bills have been overwhelmingly approved by the Senate Finance Committee, the House Ways and Means Committee, and the House Energy and Commerce Committee, but differences in the measures must still be resolved and spending offsets need to be identified.

2-Year Extension of Medicare Sequestration Cuts. While the Act provides limited relief from sequestration cuts for certain defense and non-defense spending for FYs 2014 and 2015, the Act does not extend relief to sequestration reductions impacting mandatory programs such as Medicare; the 2% reduction to Medicare provider and plan payments therefore will continue in 2014 unless additional Congressional action is taken. In fact, the Act achieves new savings by extending sequestration for mandatory programs – including Medicare – for another two years, through 2023.  The Act also “realigns” the Medicare sequestration amounts for FY 2023 to capture more of the sequestration savings during the first half of FY 2023, which falls in the legislation’s 10-year budget window. Specifically, the 2% cap on Medicare provider payment cuts will be raised to 2.9% for the first 6 months of FY 2023, and then drop to 1.11% for the second half of FY 2023. This change “scores” as $2.1 billion in savings, although the provision is billed as not increasing the overall effect of the sequester on Medicare providers. Obviously, there is a hope that Congress will adopt an alternative deficit reduction framework well before the sequestration extension would be triggered.

Extension of Therapy Cap Exceptions. The Act maintains the status quo for outpatient therapy services by extending the exceptions process for outpatient therapy caps through March 31, 2014.  The Medicare program has annual limitations (or caps) on the amount of expenses a patient can accrue for outpatient therapy services in a given year. When an exception to the cap is requested for medically-necessary services furnished through March 31, 2014, therapy providers must continue to include the KX modifier on the claim form.  All claims exceeding the cap continue to be subject to manual medical review. In addition, the Act extends the application of the therapy cap and exceptions to therapy services furnished in a hospital outpatient department through March 31, 2014 (which was otherwise set to expire on December 31, 2013).

Extension of Other Expiring Provisions. The Act extends for three months certain Medicare policies set to expire December 31, 2013, including: the floor used in the Medicare physician work geographic adjustment; certain ambulance add-on payments;the Qualified Individual program that reimburses states for certain Part B premiums; and the Transitional Medical Assistance program.

The Act also extends for six months (through March 31, 2014) the Medicare low-volume hospital payment and the Medicare-dependent Hospital program. In addition, the Act extends for one year the authority for Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans (through 2016) and certain Medicare reasonable cost contracts (through 2014).  Funding for the National Quality Forum (NQF) for certain health care performance measurement activities is extended until currently-available funds expire.

Medicare Long Term Care Hospital (LTCH) Payments. The Act includes a number of provisions impacting the provision of and payment for LTCH services provided to Medicare beneficiaries. Among other things, the Act establishes new criteria for LTCHs to be paid under the LTCH PPS rather than the acute inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) rate. In particular, the Act establishes new “site neutral” Medicare payment criteria for LTCH services provided on or after October 1, 2015. Subject to certain exceptions, LTCHs will be reimbursed at the rate otherwise paid under the IPPS unless the patient had a preceding hospital stay including at least three days in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or received qualifying ventilator services. The Act provides for a two-year transition to the site neutral payment rate, during which time a blended rate will be paid. 

For cost reporting periods beginning in FY 2020, payment for all discharges from an LTCH may be subject to the new site neutral payment limitation unless the number of discharges for which payment is not made at the site neutral payment rate is greater than 50% of the total number of discharges for the LTCH. In other words, if the LTCH’s site neutral payment rate is 50% or greater, then all discharges (beginning in the next cost reporting period) will be reimbursed at the IPPS rate. The Act requires CMS to establish a process for an LTCH subject to the IPPS payment rate to re-qualify for payment under LTCH PPS.

Moreover, the Act delays full implementation of the so-called “25% rule” for three years, through FY 2017 (when this policy is implemented, if an LTCH admits more than the specified percentage of its patients from a single acute care hospital during a fiscal year, it will be paid at a rate comparable to the IPPS rate for patients above the specified percentage threshold). In addition, the Act extends the current moratorium on establishing or increasing LTCH beds (with certain exceptions) through September 30, 2017.

For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2015, LTCH discharges paid at the site neutral payment rate or by a Medicare Advantage plan will be excluded from calculation of the LTCH’s average length of stay.

Medicaid DSH Payments.  The Act restructures planned reductions in Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments by delaying FY 2014 cuts until FY 2016 but increasing the overall level of reductions and extending cuts through FY 2023, for a total savings of $3.9 billion during the FY 2014-2023 budget window.

Strengthening Medicaid Third-Party Liability. The Act includes provisions intended to strengthen Medicaid third-party liability. Among other things, the Act reinforces Medicaid’s standing as the payer of last resort by letting states delay paying certain prenatal and preventive pediatric care claims, to the extent that doing so is cost-effective and will not adversely affect access to care. It also allows Medicaid to recover costs from beneficiary liability settlements. These provisions take effect on October 1, 2014.

CMS Updates Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, Other Part B Policies for CY 2014

On December 10, 2013, CMS published its final rule updating Medicare physician fee schedule (PFS) rates and polices for calendar year (CY) 2014, which includes a 20.1% across-the-board cut in PFS rates in 2014 (down from 24.4% projected under the proposed rule). The cuts are largely due to the statutory Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) update formula, although lawmakers are seeking agreement on legislation to block the automatic cuts. The rule also includes a number of significant Part B policy changes, including the following highlights:
 

  • The final 2014 conversion factor (CF) is $27.2006, compared to the 2013 CF of $34.0230, mainly as a result of the statutory SGR formula. Congress is expected to override this formula, either on a temporary or permanent basis, but final action is still uncertain (see legislative update below). CMS estimates that if Congress freezes the PFS update for 2014, it would actually result in a CF of $35.6446, an increase compared to 2013, due to the application of a budget neutrality adjustment. Reimbursement changes for individual procedures vary based on numerous other policies. 
  • CMS did not finalize a controversial proposal under its potentially misvalued code initiative to reduce PFS rates for more than 200 codes if Medicare physician office payment exceeds the payment under the hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) or ambulatory surgical center (ASC) prospective payment system (PPS). CMS expects to develop a revised proposal for using OPPS and ASC rates in establishing physician practice expense relative value units, which CMS will propose through future notice and comment rulemaking. CMS is continuing its efforts to identify and adjust payment for potentially misvalued codes, however, including by adopting on an interim basis work relative value units for approximately 200 additional codes. These interim values are subject for public comment until January 27, 2014.
  • CMS will make payment for non-face-to-face complex chronic care management services for Medicare beneficiaries who have multiple (two or more) significant chronic conditions, beginning in 2015. CMS will establish practice standards for such chronic care management services through future rulemaking. 
  • CMS is modifying the definition of eligible telehealth originating sites to include health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) located in rural census tracts of urban areas as determined by the Office of Rural Health Policy, which CMS expects to result in the inclusion of additional HPSAs as areas for telehealth originating sites. CMS is adding transitional care management services to the list of eligible Medicare telehealth services.
  • CMS will continue implementation of the physician value-based payment modifier, which was mandated by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to reward physicians for providing higher quality and more efficient care. The value modifier is being phased in from CY 2015 to CY 2017. CY 2014 is the performance period for the CY 2016 value modifier. CMS is finalizing plans to apply the value modifier to groups of 10 or more eligible physicians in 2016 (compared to groups of 100 or more in 2015), and increase the amount of payment at risk from 1% to 2% in 2016. CMS also is refining the methodologies used to calculate the value modifier to better identify both high and low performers for upward and downward payment adjustments. 
  • CMS has adopted its proposal to amend the “incident to” regulations to require that services and supplies be furnished in accordance with applicable state law, and that the individual performing “incident to” services meet any applicable requirements to provide the services, including state licensure requirements. The policy is intended to ensure that auxiliary personnel providing services to Medicare beneficiaries “incident to” the services of other practitioners do so in accordance with applicable state requirements, and that Medicare payments can be recovered when such services are not furnished in compliance with the state law.
  • CMS has adopted without change its proposed process to systematically reexamine payment amounts under the Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule to determine if changes in technology for the delivery of that service (e.g., changes to the tools, machines, supplies, labor, instruments, skills, techniques, and devices by which laboratory tests are produced and used) warrant an adjustment to the payment amount. Beginning with the CY 2015 PFS proposed rule, CMS will identify the test code, discuss how it has been impacted by technological changes, and propose an associated payment adjustment. CMS will solicit comments, and any payment adjustment would be adopted in the final rule, beginning with the CY 2015 final rule. 
  • CMS is establishing a centralized review process under which a single entity will make Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) coverage decisions, although the policy will not be implemented until 2015. The rule also establishes minimum standards for IDE studies and trials for which Medicare coverage of devices or routine items and services is provided (but CMS dropped earlier references to pivotal study and superiority study design criteria). 
  • CMS will apply the outpatient therapy cap limitations and related policies to outpatient therapy services furnished in a critical access hospital beginning on January 1, 2014, in conformance with the American Taxpayers Relief Act (ATRA). 
  • The final rule also addresses, among many other things: updates to the geographic practice cost indices; revisions to the calculation of the Medicare Economic Index; revisions to the Physician Quality Reporting System and the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive program; revisions to regulations regarding liability for overpayments to conform to ATRA provisions with regard to the timing of the triggering event for the ‘‘without fault’’ and ‘‘against equity and good conscience’’ presumptions; and updates to the ambulance fee schedule regulations to conform with statutory requirements. 

In light of the late release of the final Medicare PFS rule, CMS is extending the annual Medicare participation enrollment period for 2014 through January 31, 2014 (instead of the window ending on December 31, 2013). During this period, eligible physicians, practitioners, and suppliers may change their participation status, but the effective date for any participation status changes remains January 1, 2014.

Senate Finance Committee Schedules SGR Markup

On December 12, 2013, the Senate Finance Committee is scheduled to take up legislation to repeal the Medicare PFS sustainable growth rate formula and extend certain expiring health care provisions. While the current Congressional calendar leaves little time to address the latest round of SGR cuts before they take effect on January 1, 2014 (as discussed above), Congress may provide a short-term patch to provide additional time to consider more sweeping overhaul legislation. This situation is still very fluid, however, and the timing and scope of ultimate legislative action is still uncertain.

Continuing Resolution for FY 2014 Adopted; Budget Panel Could Take Up Medicare Issues

On October 16, 2013, the House and Senate approved H.R. 2775, the Continuing Appropriations Act of 2014. Under the resolution, the federal government was reopened, after being closed since October 1, 2013. The resolution also funds government operations through January 15, 2014 and suspends the debt limit through February 7, 2014. In the only health care policy provision, HHS is directed to verify the income of individuals applying for premium tax credits under the ACA. As part of the agreement, the House and Senate also agreed to go to conference on a budget resolution to establish the Congressional budget for FY 2014, which started October 1, 2013, and to set budget levels for FY 2015. Conferees are directed to present a budget agreement to Congress by December 13, 2013. As part of the conference deliberations, lawmakers are expected to address Medicare funding to some extent, particularly as lawmakers seek to avert an upcoming steep reduction in Medicare physician fee schedule payments and to extend certain Medicare provisions that expire at the end of the year. Any increases in Medicare program spending are typically offset by other health program cuts, so a wide range of Medicare policies could still be in play this year.

CMS Invites Comments on Release of Physician-Specific Payment Data

On August 6, 2013, CMS released a request for public comment on how the agency can promote greater transparency regarding physician-specific Medicare payment information. CMS is seeking input on the following specific issues:

  1. Whether physicians have a privacy interest in information concerning payments they receive from Medicare and, if so, how to properly weigh the balance between that privacy interest and the public interest in disclosure of Medicare payment information, including physician-identifiable reimbursement data;
  2. What specific policies CMS should consider with respect to disclosure of individual physician payment data that will further the goals of improving the quality and value of care, enhancing access and availability of CMS data, increasing transparency in government, and reducing fraud, waste, and abuse within CMS programs; and
  3. The form in which CMS should release information about individual physician payment, should CMS choose to release it (e.g., line item claim details, aggregated data at the individual physician level).

The request stems from a May 31, 2013 Florida federal district court decision that lifted a previous injunction prohibiting CMS from disclosing annual Medicare reimbursement payments to individual physicians. CMS notes that it is not considering public disclosure of any information that could directly or indirectly reveal patient-identifiable information. CMS will accept comments on this issue until September 5, 2013. A related CMS blog post is available here

CMS Proposes Updates to Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, Other Part B Policies for CY 2014

On July 19, 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published its proposed rule updating Medicare physician fee schedule (PFS) rates and polices for calendar year (CY) 2014. CMS projects that PFS payments will be reduced by approximately 24.4% in 2014, largely due to the statutory Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) update formula (although Congress is expected to eventually take action to block the automatic cuts, as it has in the past). The rule also includes a number of significant policy proposals, including the following highlights:

  • Under the proposed rule, CMS projects an estimated 2014 conversion factor of $25.7109, adjusted to $26.8199 to include a budget neutrality adjustment, compared to the 2013 conversion factor of $34.0230. As noted, Congress could override the SGR formula on either a temporary or permanent basis, but the timing and scope of any such action is uncertain. Reimbursement changes for individual procedures would vary based on numerous other policy proposals and updates.
  • Under its potentially misvalued code initiative, CMS is proposing to reduce PFS rates for more than 200 codes if Medicare physician office payment exceeds the payment in the outpatient hospital department or ambulatory surgical center (ASC) setting. CMS proposes limiting PFS payment in such cases to the total payment that Medicare would make to the practitioner and the facility when the service is furnished in a hospital outpatient department or ASC. Certain services would be exempt from this provision, including services without separate hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) payment rates and codes already subject to cuts pursuant to the Deficit Reduction Act imaging cap, among others). CMS estimates that this policy would have the biggest negative impact on allowed charges for independent laboratory PFS payments, radiation therapy center services, and pathology services. CMS also proposes to examine other specific codes as part of the agency’s ongoing review of misvalued codes.
  • CMS proposes to make payments for non-face-to-face complex chronic care management services for Medicare beneficiaries who have multiple (two or more) significant chronic conditions. This provision would be implemented in 2015 to provide sufficient time to develop and obtain public input on the standards necessary to demonstrate the capability to provide these services.
  • CMS proposes to modify the definition of eligible telehealth originating sites to include health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) located in rural census tracts of urban areas as determined by the Office of Rural Health Policy, which CMS expects to result in the inclusion of additional HPSAs as areas for telehealth originating sites. CMS also proposes adding transitional care management services to the list of eligible Medicare telehealth services.
  • CMS proposes to continue implementation of the physician value-based payment modifier (Value Modifier), which was mandated by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to reward physicians for providing higher quality and more efficient care. The Value Modifier is being phased in from CY 2015 to CY 2017, with CY 2013 serving as the initial performance period for the CY 2015 Value Modifier. In the proposed 2014 rule, CMS calls for the value modifier to apply to groups of 10 or more eligible physicians in 2016 (compared to groups of 100 or more in 2015), and increases the amount of payment at risk from 1% to 2% in 2016. CMS also proposes to refine the methodologies used to calculate the value-based payment modifier to better identify both high and low performers for upward and downward payment adjustments.
  • CMS proposes to amend the “incident to” regulations to require that services and supplies be furnished in accordance with applicable state law, and that the individual performing “incident to” services meet any applicable requirements to provide the services, including state licensure requirements. CMS is proposing this policy to ensure that auxiliary personnel providing services to Medicare beneficiaries incident to the services of other practitioners do so in accordance with applicable state requirements, and to ensure that Medicare payments can be recovered when such services are not furnished in compliance with the state law.
  • CMS proposes a process to systematically reexamine payment amounts under the Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule (CLFS) to determine if changes in technology for the delivery of that service (e.g., changes to the tools, machines, supplies, labor, instruments, skills, techniques, and devices by which laboratory tests are produced and used) warrant an adjustment to the payment amount. Beginning with the CY 2015 PFS proposed rule, CMS would identify the test code, discuss how it has been impacted by technological changes, and propose an associated payment adjustment. CMS would solicit comments, and any payment adjustment would be adopted in the final rule, beginning with the CY 2015 final rule. CMS would first examine the codes that have been on the CLFS the longest and then work forward, over multiple years, until all of the codes on the CLFS have been reviewed.
  • CMS proposes a centralized review process under which a single entity would be responsible for making Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) coverage decisions. The rule also would establish minimum standards for IDE studies and trials for which Medicare coverage of devices or routine items and services is provided (including pivotal study and superiority study design criteria).
  • CMS proposes to apply the outpatient therapy cap limitations and related policies to outpatient therapy services furnished in a critical access hospital beginning on January 1, 2014, in conformance with the American Taxpayers Relief Act (ATRA).
  • The sweeping rule also addresses, among many other things: updates to the geographic practice cost indices (GPCIs) and revisions to the weights assigned to each GPCI to increase the weight of work and reduce the weight of practice expense; revisions to the calculation of the Medicare Economic Index (MEI); revisions to the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) and the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive program; revisions to regulations regarding liability for overpayments to conform to ATRA provisions with regard to the timing of the triggering event for the ‘‘without fault’’ and ‘‘against equity and good conscience’’ presumptions; and updates to the ambulance fee schedule regulations to conform with statutory requirements.

The comment deadline is September 6, 2013.

House Panel Approves Bipartisan SGR Reform Bill

On July 23, 2013, the House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee approved legislation to repeal the Medicare physician fee schedule SGR formula and replace it with a period of stable payment followed by reimbursement linked to quality of care. In the first phase, the legislation would set the fee schedule update for each of years 2014 through 2018 at 0.5%. During this time, the current law payment incentives, such as the PQRS and the EHR Incentive Program will continue. After that 5-year period, providers will receive an annual update of 0.5%, but an additional update adjustment would be based on quality performance under a new Update Incentive Program (UIP). Eligible professionals could choose at any time to opt-out of the fee-for-service program and participate in alternative payment models. The bill also requires the Secretary to implement a system for the periodic reporting by physicians of data on the accuracy of relative values for physician services, such as data relating to service volume and time; the Secretary could provide incentive payments to providers for reporting this data. The bill also directs Medicare to identify improperly valued services to reduce net physician fee schedule expenditures by 1% per year for 2016 through 2018 (not budget neutral).  The full Committee is expected to vote on the legislation later this week.

House Panel Invites Comments on Draft SGR Reform Legislation

The House Energy and Commerce Committee is inviting comments on advance draft legislation to repeal the Medicare physician fee schedule sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula and replace it with a system linking payment to quality of care.   Comments will be accepted until July 9, 2013.  In a related development, on July 10, the Senate Finance Committee is holding a hearing on "Repealing the SGR (Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate) and the Path Forward: A View from CMS.” 

Health Policy Hearings

Recent Congressional hearings focusing on health policy include the following:

  • The House Energy and Commerce Committee held hearings on health insurance premiums under the ACA and drug compounding. The House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee also held a hearing on "Reforming SGR (Sustainable Growth Rate): Prioritizing Quality in a Modernized Physician Payment System," which reviewed draft SGR reform legislative language. A June 12 hearing will focus on the state perspective on the need for Medicaid reform, and a June 14 hearing will examine the federal government's response to the prescription drug abuse crisis.
  • A House Ways and Means Committee Health Subcommittee hearing addressed the “President's and Other Bipartisan Proposals to Reform Medicare," and the panel has scheduled a June 14 hearing to concentrate on proposals to reform Medicare post-acute care payments. 
  • The Homeland Security Committee held a second hearing on “Oversight and Business Practices of Durable Medical Equipment Companies.”
  • The Senate Special Committee on Aging held a hearing entitled “10 Years Later: A Look at the Medicare Prescription Drug Program." 

Senate Finance Members Seek Physician Input on SGR Reform

Following a similar initiative on the House side, leaders of the Senate Finance Committee are inviting provider input on Medicare physician payment system reform. Specifically, Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) and Ranking Member Orrin Hatch (R-UT) are requesting information on: (1) what specific reforms should be made to the physician fee schedule to ensure that physician services are valued appropriately; (2) what specific policies should be implemented that could co-exist with the current physician payment system and would identify and reduce unnecessary utilization to improve health and reduce Medicare spending growth; and (3) within the current fee-for-service system, how can Medicare most effectively incentivize physician practices to undertake the structural, behavioral, and other changes needed to participate in alternative payment models? Additional information, including a full copy of letter from Senators Baucus and Hatch to the health care provider community, is available here.  Responses are due by May 31, 2013.  The panel also has scheduled a May 14 hearing on "Advancing Reform: Medicare Physicians Payments."  

Congressional Health Policy Hearings & Markups

On May 8, 2013, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health approved by voice vote H.R. 1407, legislation to reauthorize and combine the Animal Drug User Fee Act and the Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act. TheEnergy and Commerce Committee also recently held hearings on: the Administration’s HHS budget proposal; the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight and implementation of the ACA; the lack of transparency and consumer driven market forces in U.S. health care system; and the impact of HIPAA on patient care and public safety. The House Ways and Means Health Subcommittee held a hearing on Medicare physician payment reform, and the Senate Finance Committee has scheduled a May 14 hearing on this topic.  Other Senate panels also recently held hearings on health policy issues, including: a HELP Committee hearing on "Successful Primary Care Programs: Creating the Workforce We Need"’ a Homeland Security Committee hearing on “Oversight and Business Practices of Durable Medical Equipment Companies”; and a Special Committee on Aging hearing on "The National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease: Are We On Track to 2025?"

Updated House SGR Reform Proposal

The chairmen of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and Ways and Means Committee have provided additional details regarding their proposal to repeal the current Medicare physician fee schedule sustainable growth rate (SGR) methodology and replace it with an alternative physician payment system. The update builds on comments received from the public on the panels’ February 7, 2013 outline. Among other things, the expanded proposal discusses processes to determine quality and efficiency measures that focus on evidence while being flexible and specialty-specific; recognizes the role that specialty-specific registries play in quality improvement; and addresses timely performance feedback for providers. Comments will be accepted until April 15 at sgrcomments@mail.house.gov

Obama Administration's Proposed FY 2014 Budget Includes $401 Billion in Health Program Savings

Today, the Obama Administration released its proposed federal budget for fiscal year 2014. As widely reported, the budget incorporates an offer the President made to Congress in December 2012 to achieve nearly $1.8 trillion in additional deficit reduction over the next 10 years, including $401 billion in health savings (the Administration observes that this level of cuts would “provide more than enough deficit reduction to replace the damaging cuts required by the Joint Committee sequestration”).

Virtually all provider types – and drug manufacturers – would be impacted by the budget provisions, if adopted as proposed. The budget proposal is certainly subject to change during the legislative process, particularly as the House and Senate leadership pursue alternative budget frameworks, and indeed, gridlock could prevent significant action on entitlement reform this year. Nevertheless, the proposals bear careful monitoring because they could eventually be included in any long-elusive “grand bargain” to reform the Medicare program and reduce the federal debt.

Highlights of the Administration’s Medicare and Medicaid proposals include the following:

Medicare Provider Payments

  • Reform the Medicare physician fee schedule/sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula to provide stable payments followed by payment linked to participation in an “accountable payment model.”
  • Reduce Medicare coverage of bad debts from 65% generally to 25% over three years starting in 2014.
  • Reduce Medicare indirect medical education add-on payments by $11 billion over 10 years.
  • Reduce payment for post-acute care services in several ways.
    • Reduce payment updates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), long-term care hospitals (LTCHs), skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and home health agencies (HHAs) by 1.1 percentage points, beginning in 2014 through 2023 (the update could not fall below 0%). This provision would save $79 billion over 10 years.
    • Adjust the standard for classifying a facility as an IRF (at least 75% of patient cases admitted to an IRF must meet one or more of 13 designated severity conditions), saving about $2.5 billion over 10 years.
    • Equalize IRF and SNF payments for three conditions involving hips and knees, pulmonary conditions, as well as other conditions selected by the Secretary, saving $2.0 billion over 10 years.
    • Reduce by up to 3% payments to SNFs with high rates of care-sensitive, preventable hospital readmissions, beginning in 2017, saving $2.2 billion over 10 years.
    • Implement bundled payments for post-acute care providers (LTCHs, IRFs, SNFs, and HHAs) beginning in 2018. Payments would be bundled for at least half of the total payments for post-acute care providers. Rates based on patient characteristics and other factors would be set to produce a permanent and total cumulative adjustment of -2.85% by 2020. Beneficiary coinsurance would equal levels under current law. This provision would save $8.2 billion over 10 years.
  • Align Medicare payments to rural providers with the cost of care, saving $2 billion over 10 years.
  • Align Medicare payment for clinical laboratory services with private sector rates and encourage electronic reporting of laboratory results.

Prescription Drug Provisions

  • Reduce payment for physician-administered Medicare Part B drugs from 106% of average sales price to 103% of average sales price. Manufacturers would be required to provide a specified rebate in certain instances as determined by the Secretary “to preserve access to care.”
  • Provide Medicaid-level drug rebates for brand name and generic drugs provided to beneficiaries who receive Part D low-income subsidies, saving $123 billion over 10 years.
  • Close the Medicare Part D donut hole by 2015, rather than 2020, by increasing manufacturer discounts to from 50% to 75% beginning in plan year 2015.
  • Lower Medicaid drug costs by clarifying the definition of brand drugs, excluding authorized generic drugs from average manufacturer price calculations for determining manufacturer rebate obligations for brand drugs, making a technical correction to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) alternative rebate for new drug formulations, and calculating Medicaid federal upper limits based only on generic drug prices. These proposals are projected to save $8.8 billion over 10 years. 
  • Encourage the use of generic drugs by Part D low-income subsidy beneficiaries by modifying copayments, saving approximately $7 billion over 10 years. 
  • Improve program integrity for Medicaid drug coverage by directing states to track high prescribers and utilizers of Medicaid prescription drugs; requiring manufacturers to make full restitution to states for any covered drug improperly reported by the manufacturer on the Medicaid drug coverage list; allowing more regular audits and surveys of manufacturers to ensure compliance with Medicaid drug rebate agreement requirements; requiring drugs to be electronically listed with the FDA to receive Medicaid coverage; and expanding penalties for reporting false information for the calculation of Medicaid rebates. 
  • Increase the availability of generic drugs and biologics by authorizing the Federal Trade Commission to stop companies from entering into “pay for delay” agreements and modifying the length of exclusivity on brand name biologics.

Program Integrity/Efficiency Provisions

  • Provide $640 million in combined mandatory and discretionary program integrity funding to implement activities that reduce payment error rates, prevent fraud and abuse, target high-risk services and supplies, and enhance civil and criminal enforcement for Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP. 
  • Authorize civil monetary penalties or other intermediate sanctions for providers who do not update enrollment records and permit exclusion of individuals affiliated with entities sanctioned for fraudulent or other prohibited actions from federal health care programs. 
  • Expand authority to investigate and prosecute allegations of abuse or neglect of Medicaid beneficiaries in additional health care settings.
  • Exclude radiation therapy, therapy services, and advanced imaging from the in-office ancillary services exception to the prohibition against physician self-referrals (Stark law), except in cases where a practice meets certain accountability standards, as defined by the Secretary.
  • Require prior authorization of advance imaging services.
  • Require prepayment review or prior authorization for power mobility devices.
  • Allow the Secretary to create a system to validate practitioners’ orders for certain high-risk items and services.

Other Medicare Provisions

  • Revise beneficiary cost-sharing requirements, including increased income-related premiums under Parts B and D, a new home health copayment, and increased premiums for beneficiaries with Medigap policies with particularly low cost-sharing requirements.
  • Increase the minimum Medicare Advantage (MA) coding intensity adjustment (which decreases MA plan payments to reflect differences in coding practices between Medicare fee-for-service and MA) and align employer group waiver plan payments with MA bids, saving $19 billion over 10 years. 
  • Strengthen the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) by reducing the target rate of Medicare cost growth from gross domestic product plus one percentage point to plus 0.5 percentage point.
  • Expand the availability of Medicare data released to physicians and other providers for performance improvement, fraud prevention, value-added analysis, and other purposes.

Medicaid Provisions

  • Base Medicaid rates for durable medical equipment on Medicare rates to save $4.5 billion over 10 years.
  • Align Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments with expected levels of uncompensated care to save $3.6 billion over 10 years. 
  • Affirm Medicaid’s position as a payer of last resort when another entity is legally liable to pay claims.

A 131-page Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) “Budget in Brief” summary discusses these provisions in greater detail, and also addresses other HHS agency budget proposals and discusses HHS’s implementation of private health insurance protections and programs under the ACA.

Medicare and Sequestration - What Happens Now?

Due to continuing budget gridlock in Washington, sequestration has been triggered – meaning automatic cuts to a wide range of federal programs, including Medicare payments to providers and health plans. While the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has not yet announced detailed plans for implementing the sequester requirements for its programs, this Alert answers some basic questions about sequestration and how it will impact the Medicare program. Among other things, the Alert addresses what Medicare spending is impacted by sequestration, when the Medicare cuts start, and how long sequestration will last.

House Panels Invite Comments on Medicare SGR/Physician Fee Schedule Reform

The Chairmen of the House Ways and Means Committee and House Energy and Commerce Committee are inviting comments on the outline of a proposal to permanently repeal the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula for updating Medicare physician fee schedule payments and institute other payment reforms. The lawmakers are considering a three-phase proposal. In the first phase, the SGR formula (which Congress has repeatedly overridden to avoid sharp reimbursement cuts) would be repealed, which would eliminate an estimated 25% across-the-board rate cut in 2014 and any future SGR cuts. In its place, the plan would provide an unspecified “period of predictable, statutorily-defined payment rates.” In phase two, the plan would link payment to performance on physician-endorsed measures of quality of care, while in phase three, physicians could earn additional payments based on efficiency of care. The Committees also are considering addressing several other related issues, including gainsharing, medical liability reform, Independent Payment Advisory Board repeal, and private contracting/balance billing. Comments will be accepted on the plan until February 25, 2013 at SGRComments@mail.house.gov.

February Congressional Health Policy Hearings & Markups

House Energy and Commerce subcommittees have held hearings on “Influenza: Perspective on Current Season and Update on Preparedness” and on “SGR: Data, Measures and Models; Building a Future Medicare Physician Payment System.” On the Senate side, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee voted to approve H.R. 307, the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act of 2013 (which was approved by the House last month), and S. 252, “The Prematurity Research Expansion and Education for Mothers who deliver Infants Early (PREEMIE) Act.” In addition, the Finance Committee held a hearing on ACA health insurance exchanges

Older Entries

February 11, 2013 — House Panel Hearing to Focus on Physician Payment/SGR Reform (Feb. 14)

January 30, 2013 — GAO Offers Recommendations for Medicare Physician Value Modifier Program

January 4, 2013 — Fiscal Cliff Deal Includes Medicare Cuts and Other Health Policy Changes

October 31, 2012 — CY 2013 Medicare Payment Rules at OMB

October 31, 2012 — MedPAC Meeting on Medicare Policy Issues (Nov. 1-2)

July 25, 2012 — CMS Call on Medicare Physician Value-Based Payment Modifier (Aug. 1)

June 27, 2012 — Medicare Proposed Payment Rules for 2013 Awaiting Clearance

May 14, 2012 — Congressional Health Policy Hearings

April 2, 2012 — MedPAC Issues March 2012 Medicare Recommendations

February 28, 2012 — President Obama Signs Payroll Tax Bill with Medicare/Medicaid Provisions

February 22, 2012 — Physician Value-Based Payment Modifier Program: Experience from Private Sector Physician Pay-for-Performance Programs (Feb. 29)

January 5, 2012 — New Law Provides Short-Term Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix and Extends Expiring Medicare Provisions for Two Months

January 4, 2012 — Corrections to MPFS, HOPPS/ASC Rules

December 13, 2011 — House Approves Tax/Jobs Bill with Medicare Provisions; Fate Uncertain

November 14, 2011 — CMS Issues Final Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Rule for 2012

October 28, 2011 — Final CY 2012 Medicare Payment Rules in the Pipeline

October 14, 2011 — MedPAC Endorses Medicare SGR Proposal, With Offsetting Medicare Cuts

September 30, 2011 — MedPAC Offers Medicare SGR Proposal, With Offsetting Medicare Cuts

September 27, 2011 — OIG Reviews Place-of-Service Coding for Physician Services

July 19, 2011 — CMS Issues Proposed CY 2012 Physician Fee Schedule Rule

May 31, 2011 — CMS Releases Proposed Revisions to Physician RVUs

May 13, 2011 — Congressional Hearings on Health Policy Issues

March 29, 2011 — CMS Estimates 29.5% Cut in 2012 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) Conversion Factor Without Congressional Action

March 29, 2011 — MedPAC Report to Congress on 2012 Payment Recommendations

February 18, 2011 — President Obama Proposes FY 2012 Budget

February 18, 2011 — Reprocessing Medicare Claims Affected by ACA/2010 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Changes

January 13, 2011 — CMS Revises CY 2011 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Payments

December 30, 2010 — CMS Announces Final 2011 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Rates

December 28, 2010 — President Signs into Law Physician Fee Schedule Fix/Extenders Bill, Red Flag Rule Relief, Health Policy Bills

December 15, 2010 — Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix/Extenders Bill Awaits President's Signature

December 9, 2010 — Congress Clears One-Year Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix and Other Health Policy Revisions

December 1, 2010 — President Signs Short-Term Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix, Outpatient Therapy Policy Update

November 29, 2010 — Congress Clears One-Month Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix, Therapy Policy Change

November 29, 2010 — MedPAC Meeting on Medicare Payment Adequacy (Dec. 2-3)

November 16, 2010 — CMS Issues Final CY 2011 Physician Fee Schedule Rule

October 29, 2010 — Upcoming Medicare Hospital Outpatient, Physician Fee Schedule Final Rules

August 31, 2010 — Technical Corrections to Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule

August 3, 2010 — CMS Listening Session on ACA Physician Resource Use Reporting Provisions (Sept. 24, 2010)

July 12, 2010 — CMS Issues Proposed CY 2011 Physician Fee Schedule Update

July 12, 2010 — New Law Increases Medicare Physician Rates through Nov. 2010, Clarifies Hospital Outpatient "3-Day Payment Window" Policy

July 10, 2010 — OIG Guidance on Waiver of Copayments

June 18, 2010 — Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Update

June 8, 2010 — Physician Fee Schedule Cut Takes Effect; Fix Awaits Senate Action

May 28, 2010 — Congress Wrestles with Legislation to Delay Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Cut, Make Other Health Policy Changes

May 13, 2010 — Other PPACA Updates

May 12, 2010 — 2010 Physician Fee Schedule Rule Correction Notice

April 16, 2010 — New Law Extends Physician Fee Schedule Fix Through May

April 5, 2010 — Senate to Consider Additional Short-Term Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix Extension on April 12

March 30, 2010 — Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Update: Hold on April Claims

March 17, 2010 — House Approves Additional Short-Term Extension of Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix/Therapy Cap Exception Process

March 15, 2010 — MedPAC Issues 2011 Medicare Payment Recommendations

March 11, 2010 — Senate Approves Bill to Extend Medicare Physician Payment Fix, Make Other Medicare/Medicaid Policy Changes

March 3, 2010 — New Law Provides Short-Term Physician Fee Schedule Fix, Extension of Therapy Cap Exceptions Process

March 2, 2010 — Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Cut Takes Effect; CMS Holds Claims for 10 Days

February 26, 2010 — House Approves Bill to Extend Temporary SGR Freeze, Therapy Cap Exceptions Through March 2010

February 12, 2010 — Bipartisan Senate Jobs Bill Would Extend Expiring Health Provisions

February 12, 2010 — House and Senate Pass "PAYGO" Budget Rules, Include Funding for Physician Fee Schedule Fix

January 27, 2010 — MedPAC Votes on 2011 Medicare Provider Update Recommendations

January 13, 2010 — CMS Implements Two-Month Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix

December 24, 2009 — Two-Month Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Fix Signed Into Law

December 21, 2009 — Legislative Recap: Health Reform/Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

December 19, 2009 — Senate Leaders Release Health Reform Compromise; Congress Clears 2-Month Delay of 21% Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Cut

December 16, 2009 — House Passes 2-Month Delay in Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Cut

December 10, 2009 — CMS Corrects Physician Fee Schedule Rule, Reduces Conversion Factor to $28.3895

December 4, 2009 — House Passes Medicare Physician Payment Reform

October 30, 2009 — Medicare Physician Payment Fix Blocked in Senate

September 28, 2009 — Medicare Physician Resource Use Measurement Program Listening Session (Nov. 10, 2009)

August 14, 2009 — CMS Corrects Physician Fee Schedule, Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS, and Home Health PPS Rules

July 7, 2009 — CMS Proposes CY 2010 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Rule

June 16, 2009 — MedPAC Report on Medicare Payment Policy

June 15, 2009 — House Chairmen Outline Draft Physician Fee Schedule/SGR Reforms

May 4, 2009 — Practicing Physicians Advisory Council Meeting (June 1, 2009)

April 7, 2009 — Budget Resolutions Advance with Health Reform Funding

March 13, 2009 — PQRI Educational Calls - March 18 and 19, 2009

March 10, 2009 — MedPAC Meeting -- March 12-13, 2009

March 6, 2009 — Obama Budget Proposal

February 15, 2009 — 2009 Physician Quality Reporting Initiative Call (Feb 18)

January 26, 2009 — Practicing Physicians Advisory Council Meeting (March 9, 2009)

January 9, 2009 — MedPAC to Consider Medicare Proposals January 8-9, 2009

December 31, 2008 — Corrections to Final 2009 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, Inpatient Hospital Rules

December 22, 2008 — FAQ on Mobile Testing Provider Requirements

December 22, 2008 — 2009 Physician Quality Reporting Initiative

December 19, 2008 — Congressional Budget Office Reports on Health Care Budget Options, Insurance Reform

December 8, 2008 — Physician Quality Reporting Initiative Conference Call (Dec. 16, 2008)

December 5, 2008 — CMS Issues Paper on Physician Value-Based Purchasing

December 3, 2008 — CMS Listening Session: Medicare Value-Based Purchasing Program for Physician and Other Professional Services (Dec. 9)

December 2, 2008 — E-Prescribing Update: Dec. 11 Open Door Forum, Technical Specifications Released

November 17, 2008 — Finance Chairman Baucus Outlines Health Reform Priorities

November 4, 2008 — Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Final CY 2009 Rule

November 3, 2008 — MedPAC Meeting

October 24, 2008 — Practicing Physicians Advisory Council Meeting

October 16, 2008 — Alternative Payment Localities under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

October 15, 2008 — Medicare Medical Home Demonstration

October 7, 2008 — Trends in Medicare Imaging Services

September 26, 2008 — Congressional Hearings

August 14, 2008 — HOPPS, Physician Fee Schedule Correction Notice

July 29, 2008 — Medicare Physician Payment/DMEPOS Bidding Delay Legislation Enacted

July 29, 2008 — CMS Guidance on MIPPA Implementation.

July 29, 2008 — OIG Guidance on MIPPA/Waiver of Copayments

July 29, 2008 — Practicing Physicians Advisory Council