Obama Administration Cites Record-Breaking Health Fraud Recoveries under Joint DOJ-HHS Program

According to the latest Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program (HCFAC) Annual Report, federal health care fraud prevention and enforcement efforts resulted in the recovery of a record $4.3 billion in FY 2013, up from $4.2 billion in FY 2012. In announcing detailed enforcement achievements, the Administration cites new ACA authorities – including enhanced provider screening requirements, limited enrollment moratoria, and authority to suspend Medicare payments during pending investigations -- that have improved the government’s ability to clamp down on health care fraud. The report also notes the successes of coordinated Department of Justice (DOJ) and HHS efforts such as the Health Care Fraud Prevention & Enforcement Action Team (HEAT) and interagency Medicare Fraud Strike Force teams.

DOJ Touts $3.8 Billion in FY 2013 False Claims Act Recoveries

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently announced that it recovered $3.8 billion in settlements and judgments in civil False Claims Act cases in fiscal year (FY) 2013, including health care fraud recoveries totaling approximately $2.6 billion. The DOJ notes that about $1.8 billion in recoveries involved alleged false claims for drugs and medical devices under federally insured health programs (with an additional $443 million recovered for state Medicaid programs). The Department also reports that in FY 2013, a record 752 qui tam/whistleblower suits were filed and $2.9 billion was recovered in such suits (with whistleblowers recovering $345 million).

Justice Department Reports Nearly $5 Billion in False Claims Act Recoveries for FY 2012

The Department of Justice recently announced that it secured a record $4.9 billion in settlements and judgments in civil fraud cases in FY 2012, including health care fraud recoveries totaling more than $3 billion. The Department notes that some of the largest recoveries during the year – representing nearly $2 billion -- involved false claims for drugs and medical devices under federally insured health programs (with an additional $745 million returned to state Medicaid programs). The Department also reports that in FY 2012, a record 647 qui tam/whistleblower suits were filed and a record $3.3 billion was recovered in such suits.

False Claims Act Developments: 2nd Circuit to Consider Whether In-House Lawyer can be a Qui Tam Relator

This post was written by Matthew R. Sheldon and Alexander Y. Thomas.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals is reviewing a lower court decision disqualifying a former in-house attorney from acting as a False Claims Act qui tam relator against his former employer. The relator was formerly general counsel to Unilab, a subsidiary of Quest Diagnostics Inc. The qui tam suit alleged that Unilab violated the Federal Health Care Anti-Kickback Act by engaging in a fraudulent scheme to increase medical testing referrals under the Medicare and Medicaid programs. To read the full post on Reed Smith's Global Regulatory Enforcement Law Blog, click here.

 

Justice Department FCA Recoveries Top $3 Billion in FY 2011

The Department of Justice (DOJ) has announced more than $3 billion in False Claims Act (FCA) recoveries in FY 2011, including $2.4 billion in recoveries involving federal health care program fraud. The pharmaceutical industry was the source of the largest recoveries -- the DOJ reports almost $2.2 billion in civil claims against the pharmaceutical industry in FY 2011. 

CMS Releases Final Medicare Shared Savings Program/ACO Rule

This post was written by Paul W. Pitts, Susan A. Edwards, and Debra A. McCurdy.

Today the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released its long-awaited final rule to implement the Medicare Shared Savings Program as authorized by Section 3022 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  The Shared Savings Program is intended to encourage physicians, hospitals, and certain other types of providers and suppliers to form accountable care organizations (ACOs) to provide cost-effective, coordinated care to Medicare beneficiaries.  Under the final rule, an ACO that meets established quality and performance standards and surpasses a minimum savings target will be able to share a percentage of savings (in addition to traditional fee-for-service payments under Medicare Parts A and B).  While the ACA requires CMS to "establish" the Shared Savings Program no later than January 1, 2012, CMS has indicated that it will begin accepting applications for the Shared Savings Program January 1, 2012, but the start date will be later in 2012. In the final rule, CMS made a number of notable changes to the proposed rule, as highlighted after the jump.

 

Continue Reading...

Proposed Statement of Antitrust Enforcement Policy Regarding Accountable Care Organizations

This post was written by Debra H. Dermody, Gavin Eastgate, and Michelle Mantine.

On March 31, 2011, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Department of Justice (DOJ) issued a joint proposed Statement of Enforcement Policy to explain how the agencies...

View the full post by clicking here.

Older Entries